AIME

ALLEY

CARD

Successful Author

Breast Cancer Survivor

Blogger

Proud Mother, Wife & Friend

 

About Me

I can’t remember a time that I didn’t have a book on my bedside table, probably more than one. I grew up in that nerdy family where everyone had several hours in the day to read on vacations. I learned early that keeping a journal was essential for documenting the events in my life, and for keeping emotional swings in perspective. My journal was my best friend, confidant and therapist.

In my twenties, I was home for a visit and found a stack of spiral bound notebooks that I had cleverly, or so I believed, labeled boring titles such as Algebra or Biology, and kept in a pile with other folders. As time passed, and the other books were given or thrown away, all that remained were these spirals that one flip of the cover would reveal not a series of numbers or experiments, but the inner most workings of my adolescent brain. After reading a few and losing myself in my fourteen year old brain of crushes and social dramas, I was completely mortified and snuck outside in the dark of night to bury them in the trash bins. Now, as a mother of teens myself, I wish I could take one more peek at them and offer love to that child so filled with emotions and tell her that everything would be fine. And after years of searching and seeking, adventures and heartache she will once again find her way to her passion. Stories.

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Barely into my forties, when I spent a year mired in a diagnosis and treatment for breast cancer, my writing turned into healing when I felt compelled to share my story in hopes that it might help someone else who struggled in the same way. The healing that I intended for others, was also for myself, as I discovered once again, that writing is a clear path to self-discovery and recovery.

I am a child of the South, born and raised in Nashville, Tennessee with an Art History degree from Millsaps College in Jackson, Mississippi. I have an insatiable curiosity about the personal stories in history that have gotten lost in time. Art, politics, religion, family, love and loss are the stories that we all have in common, and when placed in the backdrop of a certain time or place can illuminate treasures to learn from.

Now I live on the North Shore of Boston, balancing a busy family life with writing and working in the community. On the best days you can find me walking a nearby beach with my sidekick field spaniel, Serendipity, baking with my daughter, cheering my son on in sports, or with a glass of wine in my hand listening to music by the firepit with my husband of twenty years.

And Beneath It All Was Love

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Read for free on Kindle Unlimited

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Shortly after moving from Boston to the intensely competitive environment of Silicon Valley, I received the news: I had stage two breast cancer.

I had known of friends with cancer. Generally, they dropped out of sight, reappearing months later looking tired and wan, with thinning hair and waistlines. Suddenly I was that friend—the breast cancer patient.

Anger, fear, and anxiety threatened to take over my life. But with the support of my sister, friends, husband, and children, I would discover the love hidden just beneath her fear.

And Beneath It All Was Love recounts my journey through treatment and into recovery. My young age and pathology report indicated aggressive treatment. I would endure debilitating chemotherapy, two surgeries, and radiation therapy. I had to almost die to give myself the best chance to live.


 

From Amazon:  "Honest, raw, and ultimately uplifting, Aime’s story pulls no punches when describing the mental and physical toll of breast cancer treatment. She is not the same person who heard the dreaded words “You have cancer.” That person is gone forever. In her place is a stronger, more resilient woman who learned to treasure life as a daily gift and embrace love over fear."

Order now on Amazon

Coming Soon:  Tigerbelles

One hot Southern summer in 1960 at Tennessee State University, a regional college for black students, a coach and his team of women runners, called the Tigerbelles, sprinted on a dirt track, dodging potholes and cow piles, preparing for a shot to run on the world stage at the Olympics in Rome. Eight women on the team made it to the final competition, and four of them came back home with gold medals. This is the extraordinary story of how one team changed the face of women's athletics forever, and how the world fell in love with the Tigerbelles.

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